cityscape.jpg

Invasive Species Profiles

Daphne Laurel

All parts of Daphne laurel have toxic compounds, which can lead to dermatitis or poisoning.

daphne-laurel-01-thumb

Read more: Daphne Laurel

Orange Hawkweed

Bright and beautiful, this plant steals valuable forage habitat from our deer and bears.

orange hawkweed

Read more: Orange Hawkweed

English Ivy

This climbing evergreen can topple trees and accelerate building deterioration                                                                     

 english-ivy-thumb

Read more: English Ivy

Periwinkle

Periwinkle is a garden escapee that crowds and discourages growth of native plants.
 
periwinkle-01-thumb
 

Read more: Periwinkle

Policeman’s Helmet

Seed pods from Policeman’s helmet can explode and send seeds up to 5 meters away from the plant.

policemans-helmet-01

Read more: Policeman’s Helmet

Garlic Mustard

This Provincially designated EDRR species has hopefully been eradicated from our region though we are still on the look out for it.

Garlic Mustard

Read more: Garlic Mustard

Purple Loosestrife

Nearly 3 million seeds are produced by this aquatic invader.                                                          

purple-loosestrife-01-thumb

Read more: Purple Loosestrife

Giant Hogweed

This not-so-friendly giant causes problems for the environment and human health

gianthogweed-01-thumb

Read more: Giant Hogweed

Scotch Broom

Scotch broom oozes toxic substances into the soil that prevents native plans from establishing. 

scotch-broom-01

Read more: Scotch Broom

Himalayan Blackberry

Himalayan blackberry can leap frog across an expanse of land in only a few years.                                                             

himalayanblackberry-01

Read more: Himalayan Blackberry

Yellow Flag Iris

Native to Europe, North Africa, Western Asia and the Mediterranean, yellow flag iris has escaped cultivation and is displacing native plant diversity.

yellow-flag-iris-01

Read more: Yellow Flag Iris

Japanese Knotweed

This resilient superweed can grow through concrete foundations and walls, and can grow from only a few milligrams of root fragment.                                  

japaneseknotweed-01

Read more: Japanese Knotweed

Yellow Lamium

Illegal dumping had allowed this plant to take over precious parklands.

yellow-lamium01-thumb

Read more: Yellow Lamium